Liminal: making a 3 minute sculpture in Tate Britain

They say art is eternal, but I am not sure. I am inside Tate Britain, standing in front of the latest addition, a sculpture that encompasses beauty with a sharp social commentary on the ephemeral nature of modern culture. And just as I am admiring its beauty, a small boy, no more than three, walks in front of me, takes a block off, and walks away.

No, I have not just witnessed an act of juveline vandalism. I am in fact talking about Liminal, the piece created by artists Kieren Reed and Abigail Hunt, an open invitation to visitors of all ages to experience sculpture in a physical, material, and social way, taking place every Weekend in various places inside Tate.

Wooden blocks of all shapes and sizes lie on the floor, creating an ever-changing landscape as visitors pick them, build them up, tear them down, move them around and turn them into something completely different.

Visitors turn into impromptu artists, having the chance to create a temporary sculpture inside one of the biggest galleries in the world, and the beauty of it is how temporary it is; how you were part of this whole process, this beautiful room for this specific slice of time, before other hands take the parts that made your piece to create others.

It is amazing to think how the whole room could be conceived as a continuously moving sculpture, constructed and deconstructed by the sculptors themselves.

I watch the child pause as he realizes that I am still standing next to my piece, containing the small square box that is missing from his. I smile a smile of agreement, and he goes on, taking the piece, changing my piece, adding to his, simultaneously creating two new forms, simultaneously changing both pieces.
Our actions always simultaneously change both pieces.

Love,

G

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